We checked out 40+ soups from the supermarket shelves and chillers including single- and multi-serve sachets, cans and pouches. We compared the soups on 4 key nutrients per 100ml/g: total fat, saturated fat, sugar and sodium. The nutrient criteria are those developed by the Australian consumer organisation Choice.

We've used green, orange and red "traffic light" symbols to show the total fat, saturated fat, sugar and sodium in a product. If you see a red light, you know the food is high in something you may be trying to cut down on. Green means the food is low in that nutrient; orange is somewhere in between.

Traffic light criteria

Liquid or solid?

Labels for liquids are required to give nutrition values per 100 millilitres (ml) and solid or semi-solid foods on a per 100 grams (g) basis.

So is soup a liquid or a solid? It can be either. Soups that need to be reconstituted with water are considered liquids, so their nutrition values are given per 100ml. Ready-to-eat soups (including condensed soups) are solid foods and their nutrition values are given per 100g.

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