Old containers of hazardous chemicals
Research report
1 February 2019

Hazardous waste: A guide to disposal

Our council-by-council guide to chemical disposal.

Member comments

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Brian D.
06 Sep 2020
2 Norrth Shore disposal centres?

Its pretty poor that Auckland Council can only provide 2 north shore disposal centres for chemicals. That's a 140 km round trip from Pukekohe in the south! It only encourages illegal disposal.

Les H.
18 Feb 2019
Hazardous waste disposal in Auckland

Only the two sites eh - Silverdale & Waitakere .
Constellation Drive transfer Station refused to accept my pesticides. Not convenient to go to either of the others so, much to my dismay, suppose I will have to dispose of them in my rubbish bin! Poor show A C C.

David M.
09 Feb 2019
Auckland Council transfer stations - more info.

There's only a couple of council-operated transfer stations in the greater Auckland area (at Silverdale and Waitakere) where hazardous materials can be dropped off without charge, so unless you happen to live in a nearby suburb you'll need to make a trip across town or pay a significant fee to the contracted operator of other, closer facilities. The information provided to 'Consumer' apparently didn't indicate these "service" limitations. The other Council operated transfer stations on Waiheke Island and Great Barrier Island aren't exactly accessible to the majority of Auckland residents.

Ruth S.
02 Feb 2019
It's almost impossible to find where to dispose of hazardous waste

I recently was tasked with cleaning out my deceased father's garage in Palmerston North and after hours on the phone, starting with the local council, and being redirected many times, the only places that would help was a place in Hawkes Bay or Wellington at a cost of hundreds of dollars, including $35 - $55 per unlabelled item to be tested before they would take it away.
No wonder lots of people dump this waste irresponsibly.

Francis T.
02 Feb 2019
Batteries?

What about the thousands of rechargable nickle cadmium batteries found in garden solar lamps, electric toothbrushes etc. I'd guess 99% of these end up in landfill.

Mark W.
02 Feb 2019
Hazardous waste: A (very limited) guide to disposal.

What about other hazardous items like waste oil, paint, turps, kerosene and even petrol - I recently retired an old no-go 4 stroke lawnmower with a full tank of petrol - where can I get rid of the petrol and oil before taking it to the metal recycler. I expected answers to these when i looked at the article's title - unusually misleading Consumer!

Consumer staff
04 Feb 2019
Re: Hazardous waste: A (very limited) guide to disposal.

Hi Mark,

Thanks for your feedback. Within the resources available to this project, we had to restrict the number of product types. We chose these types based on a member survey. Some councils only accept certain types of hazardous waste, so we can't extrapolate out. However, if you want more information on the products you've mentioned, please email the research writer olivia@consumer.org.nz. She will be able to let you know if your council accepts any kind of hazardous waste and/or put you in touch with the right person at your council to help answer your questions.

Kind regards,

Natalie - Consumer NZ staff

J A G C.
02 Feb 2019
FAIL

USELESS: "Where to drop them off: Transfer station" Where the b-h is THAT?

The Real John R.
02 Feb 2019
Google

If your council operates Transfer Stations, you will find their locations if you use your preferred search engine, such as Google.